• Kearney Planters

    Feb 21 | 1459 Views | No Comments

    Kearney Planters established in 1979 by Barry Kearney’s own quest to modify his corn planter Kearney Planters is a name that farmers have grown to trust planting through harvest. Growing and adapting through the past 36 years the business has now expanded into two working shops and a new...

  • DeGoeys Nursery And Flowers

    Jul 9 | 1871 Views | No Comments

    In 1976, the DeGoey family were fresh market field growers. John and Jane DeGoey believed that growing flowers was a niche they could build, and in 1980 they built their first greenhouse for flowers. Today the whole family is involved in the thriving business. Building slowly through the years, the...

  • Geo Produce

    Jul 9 | 1873 Views | No Comments

    Starting as a 1-acre greenhouse back in 1990, the Knoteck family has grown Geo Produce to a 12+ acre, high-tech greenhouse operation. Operated by skilled professionals, Geo Produce grows 7 acres of red, yellow and orange bell peppers as well as 4.5 acres of TOV greenhouse product, such as...

  • Buis Beef

    Jul 9 | 1963 Views | No Comments

    Buis Beef is a third generation family farm with a mixed farming operation with vegetable crops (sweet-corn, green beans) and field crops (corn and beans & wheat) as well as a herd of 350 beef cows. They are known as an innovative farm because they are not afraid to try new operational...

  • Jennen Family Farm Market

    Jul 9 | 1737 Views | No Comments

    The Jennen’s have been in Wabash for over 20 years. Their family farm has grown every year, with recent expansion to 12 acres of High Tunnels and into long-season berry production. The High Tunnels allow for a longer and more sustainable growing season by moderating temperature, wind and...

  • River Bell Market Garden

    Jul 9 | 1446 Views | No Comments

    River Bell Market Garden has been farming organically since 19990 and has been certified organic for fruits and vegetables since 2003. Their unique “organic vegetable box” program delivers a crate of fresh organic vegetables to your house or a local drop-off area throughout the year. River Bell...

  • Giffin’s Maple Syrup Products

    May 7 | 3033 Views | No Comments

    Giffin’s Maple Syrup Products is a family operation owned Don and Jean Giffin.  They began their maple syrup operation in 1980 and have 2800 taps in their 50-acre maple bush. Always open to innovation, in 2015 Giffins started utilizing reverse osmosis for production, which removes 75% of water...

  • The Pickle Station

    May 7 | 1570 Views | No Comments

    In 1964, Norm VanRoboys sold a load of cucumbers to Walter Bick, founder of Bick’s Pickles. That same year, VanRoboys contracted 2 million pounds of cucumbers to Chatham-Kent farmers, which was the beginning of VanRoboys “Pickle Station”. Today, the third generation of VanRoboys manages the...

  • McGrail Farm Equipment

    May 7 | 2020 Views | No Comments

    McGrail Farm Equipment has been a successful Southwestern Ontario John Deere dealer for 50 years. John Deere is continually developing new products to improve agriculture production. McGrail Farm Equipment is committed to enhancing the capabilities of the products they sell by keeping all employees...

  • Devolder Farms

    Mar 27 | 1742 Views | No Comments

    Recognizing the needs of other farmers in the area, Bob and Diane Devolder established Devolder Farms Seeds in 1988. Today, Devolder Farms is a family-owned and operated business with an active presence within the farming Chatham-Kent community. In 1974, Bob Devolder acquired and has maintained his...

  • Early Acres Estate Winery

    Mar 27 | 1643 Views | No Comments

    Wine production is truly a family experience for Mike and Sue Korpan. Their Early Acres Estate Winery is set on 7.5 acres of sandy loam soil, which is perfectly suited to the success of their grapes. The warm summers and cool falls of Chatham-Kent provide the perfect combination of flavour and body...

  • Sunshine Farms

    Dec 15 | 1491 Views | No Comments

    Sunshine Farms, founded by John and Claudia Jaques,  began growing  and pickling asparagus in 1982. Once their friends and family tasted the fresh, crisp product, the demand grew. Today, Sunshine Farms, also run by sons Josh, Ben and Adrian, offer fresh asparagus as well as 23 types of pickles,...

  • The Ag Mag

    Nov 7 | 2319 Views | No Comments

    Here is the latest copy of the AgMag.  Enjoy! AgMag_WEB  ...

  • Uher’s Performance Feeds

    Sep 30 | 1989 Views | No Comments

    Uher’s Performance Feeds not only provides feed for livestock and pet food for small animals, they provide solutions to your feed challenges.  From wine, cattle and equine feed to sheep, poultry, game bird, pet feed and wild birdseed, customers can find all of this and more in-store at Uher’s...

  • Lloyd Bag Company

    Sep 19 | 2014 Views | No Comments

    Since 1939, the Lloyd Bag Company has been manufacturing and distributing bags throughout North America.  Today they manufacture and import woven fabric bags including jute, burlap, leno mesh, woven polypropylene, cotton, canvas, paper, bulk bags, BOPP bags and tote bags. With a variety of...

  • Crazy Eight Barn

    Sep 2 | 1862 Views | No Comments

    Expanding Chatham-Kent’s agri-tourism market is the popular Crazy Eight Barn. The 8-sided barn was originally built for stabling animals, but was left empty for years until Susanne Spence-Wilkins saw it and made plans of her own. She carefully disassembled the building and moved it to Palmyra, on...

  • Dover Corn Products

    Aug 19 | 1909 Views | No Comments

    Dover Corn Products Ltd., a 100% Canadian, family owned and operated facility, is quickly becoming an industry leader in the dry corn milling market. They are proud to bring one of Canada’s oldest and most stable industries back to Ontario. Dover Corn Products is the only dry corn mill in...

  • Thompsons Limited

    Aug 5 | 1623 Views | No Comments

    Since 1924, Thompsons principal business has involved the distribution of corn, soybeans, wheat, and dry beans as well as providing farmers with the necessary inputs to produce and grow successful crops. Thompsons Limited provides high quality agricultural supplies and services, including seed,...

  • London Agricultural Commodities

    Feb 14 | 2179 Views | No Comments

    London Agricultural Commodities (LAC) is privately held enterprise that operates two facilities in Chatham-Kent, has several marketing arrangements with independently owned elevators throughout Ontario.  Through our London office, LAC markets a variety of grains around the world. In Tupperville,...

  • Roesch Meats And More

    Feb 7 | 1991 Views | No Comments

    Roesch Meats and more has been serving the highest quality, freshest meats available since 1995. Their pork is fed and raised on-site, with no medication in the feed or water. They also offer Ontario beef and chicken, and all is sold through their on-site retail operation.  Lamb is available...

  • Harvest-Pac Products Inc.

    Jan 17 | 2023 Views | No Comments

    With the belief that if you begin with a superior raw product, you will produce a superior finished product, Harvest-Pac Products has been processing locally-grown vegetables and fruit since the early 1990s. Prior to entering into the processing side of the business, three generations of the...

  • Delhaven Orchards

    Jan 7 | 1690 Views | No Comments

    Delhaven Orchards Ltd. is a family farm owned and operated by Marilyn and Hector Delanghe. Over 400 acres are farmed and crops grown include apples (16 varieties), peaches (12 varieties), sweet cherries (6 varieties), pears (3 varieties), apricots (4 varieties), nectarines (3 varieties),...

  • Truly Green Farms

    Dec 23 | 1703 Views | No Comments

    Recognized as the first of its kind in North America, Truly Green Farms, operated by the Devries family, is 22.5 acres of greenhouse that produces up to 21 million kilograms of tomatoes annually. In partnership with GreenField Ethanol, the green house utilizes the ethanol plant’s waste heat and...

  • Pride Seeds

    Dec 17 | 1198 Views | No Comments

    The goal of Pride Seeds is to create a unique product experience that results in higher profits for corn, soybean and forage crop growers. Pride strives to increase profitability for growers by delivering superior seed. Pride Seeds is part of AgReliant Genetics, which has one of the largest...

  • Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    on September 20 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    By: Amanda Tracey, Vegetable Crops Specialist, OMAFRA, Ridgetown and Cheryl Trueman, Department of Plant Agriculture, Ridgetown Campus – University of Guelph

    With tomato harvest in full swing, it is time to wrap up the late blight spore trapping for this growing season.

    As mentioned in a previous post, this is Year 1 of a three-year research project to assess the value of different spore traps and forecasting models to predict late blight risk for field tomatoes. We are comparing the Spornado and rotorod spore traps at eight sites in Kent County (Fig. 1), along with the BliteCast forecasting model.
    DNA of Phytophthora infestans, the organism that causes late blight, was detected bySpornado traps at 3 of 8 sites for the August 26-29 sampling period (Table 1).
    Rotorod traps detected spores of P. infestans at 0 of 8 sites for the August 26-29 sampling period (Table 1).

    Sept.4.2019 LB Spore Trap results table

    Table 1. Number of sites out of eight (8) in Kent County, with a positive detection forPhythophthora infestans, the organism that causes late blight.
    * first sampling period with a positive detection for late blight.
    – data currently unavailable

    Late blight symptoms have been confirmed on a potato plants in Norfolk County.

    Late blight caused by the US-23 genotype has been observed in Wisconsin on potato and in New York and Pennsylvania on tomato and potato. Pennsylvania on tomato, but there are no reports of symptoms on any crops in Ontario or Michigan.

    A summary of fungicides for late blight management is available here.

    If you suspect late blight in your tomato crop, please reach out to Amanda Tracey (Amanda.tracey@ontario.ca, 519-350-7134) to confirm the diagnosis. Cheryl is away on parental leave and will not be available for the remainder of the growing season.

    Project collaborators: Tomecek Agronomic Services, Sporometrics, Phytodata, and Genevieve Marchand (AAFC).

    Funding acknowledgement: Ontario Tomato Research Institute, Fresh Vegetable Growers of Ontario, and the Ontario Agri-Food Innovation Alliance.

    Links to previous late blight posts from the 2019 season: June 20July 10July 20August 7August 14August 21August 28.

    Read More »
  • Vegetable Crop Report – September 4

    on September 19 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Vegetable Crop Report – September 4

    Temperature – Generally cooler weather combined with heavier morning dews and some precipitation has continued to be conducive to the development of plant pathogens in many of the vegetable growing regions in the past week. Continue being vigilant for symptoms of pathogen infection in fields which are not yet harvested, and incorporate remaining plant material into the ground once fields are harvested. Chatham, Essex, Kemptville, Norfolk and Wellington growing regions held steady with their average degree day accumulations, while remaining regions continue to be significantly to marginally behind their average degree day accumulations.

    Rainfall – August brought no clear trend in precipitation with Durham and Norfolk counties receiving above average rain for the month, and others ranging from just below average to significantly below. The Essex, Huron, and Sudbury growing regions are well on their way to their September precipitation averages, while the other regions range from no precipitation to about 5 mm in the first few days of the month.

    Crop Updates

    Brassica Crops – Diamondback moths and flea beetles continue to be the most common insect challenge this year. Conditions have been favourable for Alternaria, black rot and fusarium wilt.

    Carrot – Risk of disease is the main issue in carrots currently. Be on the lookout for Alternaria and Cercospora leaf blights developing on older leaves as the overnight temperatures cool. Also be sure to check between the rows under the canopy for signs of white mould starting to develop on old and dying leaves.

    alternaria.jpg                              Picture 1: A patch of Alternaria leaf blight.

    white rotPicture 2: White Mould of Carrot growing on lower leaves.

    Celery – Celery harvest is underway. For late plantings, continue to scout for bacterial blight, pink rot and celery leaf curl. Avoid scouting when leaves are wet as pathogens can spread easily on clothes and equipment throughout the field.

    Garlic – Planting season is underway in some areas. Early plantings have an increased chance of bolting and winterkill. When purchasing planting stock this fall, send some cloves for bulb and stem nematode testing prior . Even cloves with an intact basal plate and no observable damage may have nematodes. There will be another full day workshop in Guelph on December 4th that will cover every part of garlic production including clean seed, cultivar selection, seeding density, nutrient testing, scape removal, weed control, crop insurance, harvesting, grading, storing as well as scouting/pest management. To register, call the Agriculture Information Contact Centre at 1 877-424-1300.

    Onions – Harvest is underway in transplants and some early direct seeded onions. The level of thrips has reached the spray threshold in most areas. Downy mildew was been confirmed in Ontario transplant onions last week; but conditions have not been favourable for sporulation and infection in the major onion growing regions. The weather has been conducive for Stemphylium leaf blight development which has caused significant leaf tip dieback in some areas. Conditions have also been favourable for pink root and onion smut development this year and will impact the yield in many fields come harvest.

    Potatoes – The threat of late blight remains front and center as some fields will need a few more weeks of green tops and good weather to fill out. Plants infected with late blight were confirmed in Norfolk county last week but there have been no new reports. The season also seems to bring a late flush of insects as black cutworms have popped up and a small amounts of aphids have been seen in some fields. Continue to scout you fields for signs of disease and insects as the finish line draws nearer.

    Read More »
  • Gesagard Herbicide Label Expanded Via Minor Use Program For Use On Parsley

    on September 19 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Gesagard Herbicide Label Expanded Via Minor Use Program For Use On Parsley

    J. Chaput, OMAFRA, Minor Use Coordinator, Guelph

    The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of a minor use label expansion registration for Gesagard 480SC® Herbicide for control of labeled weeds on parsley in Canada. Gesagard 480SC® Herbicide was already labeled for use on a number of crops in Canada for control of several weeds.

    This minor use project was submitted by the national minor use program at Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Pest Management Centre as a result of minor use priorities established by growers and extension personnel.

    The following is provided as an abbreviated, general outline only. Users should be making weed management decisions within a robust integrated weed management program and should consult the complete label before using Gesagard 480SC® Herbicide.

    Crop(s) Target Rate (L/ha) Application Information PHI (days)
    Parsley Labeled weeds 3.75-4.58 L product/ha Apply prior to weed emergence or early post emergence to parsley before weeds reach 5 cm high. Application on sandy soils may result in crop injury. Do not apply if parsley is under water stress. 30

    Gesagard 480SC® Herbicide is toxic to aquatic organisms, small wild animals, certain beneficial insects and non-target terrestrial plants. Do not apply this product or allow drift to other crops or non-target areas. Do not contaminate off-target areas or aquatic habitats when spraying or when cleaning and rinsing spray equipment or containers.

    There are significant precautions and detailed directions for use on the Gesagard 480SC® Herbicide label; follow these carefully.

    Note:  This article is not intended to be an endorsement or recommendation for this particular product, but rather a notice of registration activity

    Read More »
  • A Chatham-Kent Pumpkin, “Oh My Gourd.”

    on September 18 | in Kim Cooper | by | with Comments Off on A Chatham-Kent Pumpkin, “Oh My Gourd.”

    While the first day of fall isn’t until September 23rdI couldn’t help but feel like it was already here when I jumped into the car this morning and had to turn on the heat and defog the windshieldNow, I know that we will most probably get some more hot weather that teases us into thinking that it is still summer, but for a guy like me who loves everything about fall, I am pretty happy.  For as long as I can remember, fall has been my favorite time of year. The cooler days, the beautiful landscapes of leaves turning orange and falling from trees, Thanksgiving stuffing and Halloween candy, and of course pumpkins.  You cannot think of autumn without thinking of pumpkins. 

    Today, we are going to learn more about the pumpkin, identify the biggest producer of them in Canada, and share some interesting facts.  

    By definition, a pumpkin is a round, orange type of squash that grows on a plant also called a pumpkin.  It is most commonly known as the raw material needed for a jack-o’-lantern, the artists tool of choice for carving on Halloween, and the key ingredient in my wife’s favorite autumn beverage, a pumpkin spice latte.  While pumpkin spice lattes may have dominated every autumnal season in recent memory, did you know that pumpkins have been on earth for a whopping 5,000 years 

    There’s so much more to the fruit than Starbucks, including its honorable contributions to the pie universe, its superfood status, and of course, its origin story. And yes folks, a pumpkin is considered a fruit! More on that later.  

    Here’s everything you need to know about fall’s favorite food. 

    Pumpkins are most commonly harvested in the fall, and they’re often associated with Halloween, when kids and adults alike all over the world traditionally hollow them out and carve faces on them.  Most popular carving ideas for 2019 include owls, witches, minions, and Donald Trump.   

    Mathias Willemijns of Belgium set the current world record for heaviest pumpkin back in Oct. 2016 with one that weighed a whopping 2,624 pounds, according to the Guinness World Records.  With a 2,624-pound pumpkin, who could bake one heck of beauty pumpkin pie! 

    The word “pumpkin” showed up for the first time in the fairy tale Cinderella.  A French explorer in 1584 first called them “gros melons,” which was translated into English as “pompions,” according to History. It wasn’t until the 17th century that they were first referred to as pumpkins. 

    The original jack-o’-lanterns were made with turnips and potatoes by the Irish.  In England, they used large beets and lit them with embers to ward off evil spirits. Irish immigrants brought their customs to America, but found that pumpkins were much easier to carve. 

    The largest pumpkin pie ever baked weighed 3,699 pounds.  The pumpkin pie originated in the colonies, just not as we know it today. Colonists would cut the tops of pumpkins off, remove the seeds, fill the pumpkins with milk, spices, and honey, then bake them in hot ashes. 

    Each pumpkin has about 500 seeds.  They take between 90 and 120 days to grow, which is why it’s recommended that they are planted between May and July. 

    There are more than 45 different varieties of pumpkin. They range in color like red, yellow, and green, and have names like Hooligan, Cotton Candy, and Orange Smoothie. 

    Pumpkins are technically fruit.  More specifically, they are a winter squash in the family Cucurbitacae, which includes cucumbers and melons. However, because they’re savory, many people just call them vegetables anyway. 

    Every single part of a pumpkin is edible.  True folks, you can eat the skin, leaves, flowers, pulp, seeds, and even the stem! 

    Pumpkins are 90% water, which makes them a low-calorie food.  One cup of canned pumpkin has less than 100 calories and only half a gram of fat.  In comparison, the same serving size of sweet potato has triple the calories. They also have more fiber than kale, more potassium than bananas, and are full of heart-healthy magnesium and iron. 

    It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown.  In 1966, Charles Schulz introduced the Great Pumpkin.  Linus says, “Each year, the Great Pumpkin rises out of the pumpkin patch that he thinks is the most sincere.”  

    The pumpkin carving tradition comes from an ancient Celtic custom which was brought to America by European immigrants. 

    Lastly, and in my best David Letterman voice – the number one fact about pumpkins in Canada is 

    Chatham-Kent is the number one producer of pumpkins in all of Canada!  

    Remember folks, As the seasons change and Autumn works its way to winter, be sure to take it all in. Enjoy Autumn by just getting outside and taking advantage of the foods and pleasures that are unique to Chatham-Kent and to this season. 

    God Bless, 

    Anthony  

     

    Remember that here in Chatham-Kent “We Grow for the World.”  Check out our community agriculture website at wegrowfortheworld.com 

     

    Anthony Wilson is an Economic Development Officer with the Municipality of Chatham-Kent, and can be reached at anthonyw@chatham-kent.ca  

     

     

     

    Read More »
  • Vegetable Crop Report – September 12, 2019

    on September 17 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Vegetable Crop Report – September 12, 2019

    Temperature – Degree day accumulation slowed this week across most of the growing regions as cooler weather arrived. Continue to be vigilant in scouting for pathogens as crops approach harvest as cooler weather combined with heavy dew and precipitation may be conducive for the development of plant pathogens. Chatham and Essex, have held steady with their average degree day accumulation while Kemptville, Norfolk and Wellington have fallen back below their average degree day accumulations along with the other growing regions.

    Rainfall – All growing regions received rainfall in the past week with varying amounts based on location. Essex has already received two thirds of its average rainfall and is well on its way to exceeding its September average. Remaining growing regions have received about half or below their monthly averages. Remember to try and avoid scouting or equipment through fields when they are still wet. This will help to avoid the spread of some plant pathogens, especially in fields which are still a few weeks away from harvest.

    Crop Updates

    Brassica Crops – Diamondback moths and flea beetles continue to be problems in multiple areas. Scout for Alternaria, downy mildew and look for stunted plants. A clubroot pathotype study is underway; if you have Brassicas with clubroot and are interested in determining what pathotype of clubroot is present, E-mail travis.cranmer@ontario.ca for more information.

    Clubroot_cauliflowerFig 1. Clubroot causing stunting in cauliflower.

    Celery – Celery harvest continues. For late plantings, continue to scout for bacterial blight, pink rot and celery leaf curl. Avoid scouting when leaves are wet as pathogens can spread easily on clothes and equipment throughout the field.

    Garlic – Planting season is underway. Check planting stock for bulb and stem nematode before planting. Even cloves with an intact basal plate and no observable damage may have nematodes present. There will be another full day workshop in Guelph on December 4th that will cover every part of garlic production including clean seed, cultivar selection, seeding density, nutrient testing, scape removal, weed control, crop insurance, harvesting, grading, storing as well as scouting/pest management. To register, call the Agriculture Information Contact Centre at 1 877-424-1300.

    Onions – Onion harvest is underway. Downy mildew was confirmed in Ontario transplant onions two weeks ago; but no infections have been seen in the major onion growing regions. The level of Stemphylium leaf blight development seemed to be less than last year and the level of thrips this year was low in most areas. The level of pink root and onion smut seemed to be higher this year but overall yield and quality seems to be good across the province.

    Read More »
  • Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    on September 16 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    As mentioned in a previous post, this is Year 1 of a three-year research project to assess the value of different spore traps and forecasting models to predict late blight risk for field tomatoes. We are comparing the Spornado and rotorod spore traps at eight sites in Kent County (Fig. 1), along with the BliteCast forecasting model.
    DNA of Phytophthora infestansthe organism that causes late blight, was detected by Spornado traps at 1 of 8 sites for the July 15-18 sampling period, 4 of 8 sites for the July 18-22 sampling period, 7 of 8 sites for the July 25-29 sampling period, 2 of 8 sites for the July 29-August 1 sampling period, 2 of 8 sites for the August 1-5 sampling period and 3 of 8 sites for the August 8-12 sampling period.
    Rotorod traps detected spores of P. infestans at 1 of 8 sites for the July 22-25 sampling period, 2 of 8 sites for the July 29-August 1 sampling period, 1 of 8 sites for the August 1-5 sampling period and 5 of 8 sites for the August 5-8 sampling period.
    Late blight symptoms caused by the US-23 genotype have been observed in New York and Wisconsin on potato. More recently, there has been a report of late blight in Pennsylvania on tomato, but there are no reports of symptoms on any crops in Ontario or Michigan.

    A summary of fungicides for late blight management is available here.

    If you suspect late blight in your tomato crop, please reach out to Amanda Tracey (Amanda.tracey@ontario.ca, 519-350-7134) to confirm the diagnosis. Cheryl is away on parental leave and will not be available for the remainder of the growing season.

    Project collaborators: Tomecek Agronomic Services, Sporometrics, Phytodata, and Genevieve Marchand (AAFC).

    Funding acknowledgement: Ontario Tomato Research Institute, Fresh Vegetable Growers of Ontario, and the Ontario Agri-Food Innovation Alliance.

    Links to previous late blight posts from the 2019 season: June 20July 10July 20August 7.

    Read More »
  • Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    on September 15 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Current Late Blight Risk In Ontario Field Tomatoes

    By: Cheryl Trueman, Department of Plant Agriculture, Ridgetown Campus – University of Guelph and Amanda Tracey, Vegetable Crops Specialist, OMAFRA, Ridgetown

    As mentioned in a previous post, this is Year 1 of a three-year research project to assess the value of different spore traps and forecasting models to predict late blight risk for field tomatoes. We are comparing the Spornado and rotorod spore traps at eight sites in Kent County (Fig. 1), along with the BliteCast forecasting model.

    DNA of Phytophthora infestansthe organism that causes late blight, was detected by Spornado traps at 1 of 8 sites for the July 15-18 sampling period, 4 of 8 sites for the July 18-22 sampling period, 7 of 8 sites for the July 25-29 sampling period and 2 of 8 sites for the July 29-August 1 sampling period.
    Rotorod traps detected spores of P. infestans at 1 of 8 sites for the July 22-25 sampling period and 2 of 8 sites for the July 29-August 1 sampling period.
    Late blight symptoms caused by the US-23 genotype have been observed in New York and Wisconsin on potato, but there are no reports of symptoms on any crops in Ontario or Michigan.

    A summary of fungicides for late blight management is available here.

    If you suspect late blight in your tomato crop, please reach out to Amanda Tracey (Amanda.tracey@ontario.ca, 519-350-7134) to confirm the diagnosis. Cheryl is away on parental leave and will not be available for the remainder of the growing season.

    Project collaborators: Tomecek Agronomic Services, Sporometrics, Phytodata, and Genevieve Marchand (AAFC).

    Funding acknowledgement: Ontario Tomato Research Institute, Fresh Vegetable Growers of Ontario, and the Ontario Agri-Food Innovation Alliance.

    Links to previous late blight posts from the 2019 season: June 20July 10July 20.

    Read More »
  • Vegetable Crop Report – August 29, 2019

    on September 1 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on Vegetable Crop Report – August 29, 2019

    Temperature – Cooler weather combined with morning dew and some precipitation has been conducive to the development of plant pathogens in many of the vegetable growing regions in the past week. Harvest of early planted crops is well underway or finished in many growing regions as remaining fields continue to track toward harvest.  The Durham, Huron, Peterborough, Simcoe, and Sudbury growing regions are still tracking marginally to significantly behind their average degree day accumulation; while the Chatham, Essex, Kemptville, Norfolk and Wellington growing regions have all caught up to their average degree day accumulations.

    Rainfall – Precipitation was once again sporadic across most regions with some receiving about 5mm to others with 30+mm in the past week. Norfolk and Durham counties have well exceeded their average August rainfall totals, while remaining regions continue to progress toward their respective averages.

    Crop Updates

    Brassica Crops – Alternaria is present in most regions across the province. Conditions have been favourable for black rot and fusarium wilt. Flea beetles and diamondback moths continue to be high this year.

    Carrot – As the weather cools, risk of disease becomes higher. Leaf blights are starting to show up in carrot fields. Check for white mold development between rows as canopies have closed. Consider trimming back canopies which has been shown to reduce white mold while not affecting yield. 

    Celery –Celery harvest is underway. Bacterial blight and celery leaf curl has been common. Scout for aphids, bacterial blights and leaf diseases

    Garlic – Planting season is quickly approaching. If you are buying planting stock, ensure that you test cloves for bulb and stem nematode. Even cloves with an intact basal plate and no observable damage may have nematodes. There will be another full day workshop in Guelph on December 4th that will cover every part of garlic production including clean seed, cultivar selection, seeding density, nutrient testing, scape removal, weed control, crop insurance, harvesting, grading, storing as well as scouting/pest management. To register, call the Agriculture Information Contact Centre at 1 877-424-1300.

    Onions – Downy mildew has been confirmed in Ontario transplant onions (picture below); but away from major onion growing regions. Most areas have not had favourable conditions for sporulation and infection. Harvest is underway in transplants and some early direct seeded onions. The level of thrips has reached the spray threshold in most areas.

    oniondowneymildewcropped.jpg

    Potatoes – A few plants with late blight symptoms have been confirmed and subsequently destroyed in Norfolk County. No other late blight symptoms have been reported in the province, but risk increases as weather becomes more conducive. Continue to be diligent with fungicide sprays and include late blight specific products in your spray rotation. If you suspect late blight in your field, please contact Dennis at dennis.vandyk@ontario.ca, (519) 766-5337.

    Sweet Corn – Over the second half of August, there were several key weather patterns that brought with them a higher chance of corn earworm migration (picture below) into the Great Lakes basin.  The event occurred fairly regularly (August 12, 16, 19, 26 and 28th) suggesting that Southern Ontario is likely at a higher risk of corn earworm infestation as the final planting reach the silking stage.

    Information posted on the Pennsylvania State University Pest Watch website (http://www.pestwatch.psu.edu/sweetcorn/tool/index.html) shows consistent traps counts in the North Eastern United States over the same period of time.

    When corn earworm are present in an area, protect corn silks as soon as they emerge until they dry down.  Any green silk is an attractive egg laying site for the female moths.

    Keep in mind that there is wide-spread resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in the corn earworm population.  Once the plants are silking, replace pyrethroid insecticide with products from either the group 28 mode of action (Coragen).

    CEW.JPG

    Read More »
  • SOYBEAN MANAGEMENT ISSUES FOR 2019

    on August 29 | in Tek Talk | by | with Comments Off on SOYBEAN MANAGEMENT ISSUES FOR 2019

    By the OMAFRA Field Crop Team

    Delayed Planting

    The spring of 2019 was unprecedented in Ontario. Cool temperatures and constant rainfall delayed planting of much of the crop. Most soybeans were planted in June, and for some growers it was July. There are often pockets of the province that can’t plant due to wet soil conditions, but we have not experienced such wide geography struggling to plant before. How will this late planting impact soybeans? The good news is that soybeans are amazingly resilient and can adapt to the growing season due to the photoperiod effect. When days begin to shorten in the fall soybean plants will naturally speed up maturity so that they can normally finish before a killing frost. Typically, a one-month delay in planting results in only a 10-day delay at harvest. However, this ability to compensate comes at a price. Soybeans planted during the first week of May typically spend about 60 days in the reproductive phase of development (R1-R6). This is when the majority of the yield is made. Beans planted during the first week of June will speed through these same stages in about 45 days. This cuts yield potential. Excellent summer growing conditions and an open fall can make up for some of this lost potential. Best management practices to minimize plant stress become even more important in a year like 2019 when plants have less time to recover from diseases, insects, and other stresses.

    Insects

    Significant soybean aphid (SBA) populations have not been found to date in Ontario. Reports of infestations in the Mid-west may result in aphid migrants arriving here over the next weeks via storm fronts. SBA management is essential, especially when conditions turn dry since yield losses are highest when plants are already stressed. Since plants are small this year, extra attention will be necessary to minimize injury. The Aphid Advisor app is available to help decide if a spray is required or whether the natural enemies can control them for you. Go to the Aphid Advisor website to download the app for free. Japanese beetles may also become an issue as populations are abundant this year.

    To date, spider mite damage has been limited, but field scouting will be important as hot, dry weather favours mite development. Mites feed on individual plant cells from the underside of leaves leaving stipples. Severe stippling causes yellowing, curling and bronzing of leaves. Spider mites usually start on the edge of the field, but wind can carry them to any part of the field. Fields that are close to neighbouring winter wheat stubble, hay fields and no-till fields are more at risk. Four or more mites per leaflet or one severely damaged leaf per plant before pod fill indicates that control is required.

    Nutrient Deficiencies

    When soybeans are planted into less than ideal conditions, there may be seed slot smearing and compaction. This impedes root development which increases nutrient deficiencies. Potash (K) and Manganese (Mn) deficiency are widespread this year. These two nutrient deficiencies have unique leaf symptoms. K deficient leaves turn yellow along the leaf margins while Mn deficient leaves turn yellow across the whole leaf except for the veins which remain green. A soil test is the only reliable way to know if a field is truly low in K or only showing stress-induced potash deficiencies. It’s also important to note that K deficiency symptoms may indicate soybean cyst nematode (SCN) feeding on the roots. Check roots and when taking soil samples, ask the lab to also test for SCN.

    Symptoms of Mn deficiency are interveinal chlorosis (yellowing) while the leaf veins remain green. Mn symptoms will appear on the younger leaves first. One of the most significant factors affecting the availability of Mn is soil pH. As soil pH increases, less Mn is available to the plant. The deficiency is most common on poorly-drained soils, especially clays. High organic matter also ties up Mn. A foliar application of Mn works well to rectify the deficiency and can provide a 5 + yield response.

    Nitrogen fertilizer is not typically applied to soybeans unless there is a nodulation failure on first-time fields. However, some research on July planted soybeans has shown favourable results to a small amount of nitrogen fertilizer, especially if plant stands are poor. When soybean fields are stressed, due to late planting followed by dry conditions, an application of 50 lbs/ac of urea broadcast before a rain can give soybeans a significant boost.

    Diseases and Nematodes

    Soybean fields should be scouted for soybean cyst nematodes (SCN) starting 35-40 days after planting. Even resistant varieties should be checked for shifts in race populations. Seedling diseases, such as fusarium and phytophthora, are widespread this year. Recognition of disease pressure is important to make good variety and fungicide seed treatment decisions in the future. There are no foliar sprays that will control seedling root diseases. Foliar fungicides will aid in the control of white mould and other foliar diseases. If a field has the potential for significant white mould, two applications of a fungicide is often the best strategy. This is gauged by previous field history and the weather. The first application needs to be completed relatively early during the reproduction growth stages (R1.5) followed up by a second application 14 days later if weather conditions are cool and wet. If conditions are relatively dry and hot, the development of white mound is unlikely. A white mould forecasting tool is available for Apple, and Android smartphones called the Sporecaster. It can be downloaded for free from the App Store and will indicate the likelihood of white mould spores in your geography.

    Read More »
  • POLLINATOR SANCTUARIES ON YOUR FARM

    on August 28 | in Ag News | by | with Comments Off on POLLINATOR SANCTUARIES ON YOUR FARM

    Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario Commentary

    By Paul Bootsma, CFFO Field Services Manager

    On July 3, the Ontario Soil & Crop Improvement Association (OSCIA) hosted a tour of three sites that are part of Operation Pollinator.

    Operation Pollinator is “an international biodiversity program from Syngenta, designed to enhance the number of pollinating insects on farms and in out-of-play areas on golf courses.” The program enabled farmers to establish pollinator habitat on marginal land by providing pollinator-friendly seed mix and expert advice on best management of pollen and nectar habitats.

    In 2018, OSCIA partnered with the Soil Conservation Council of Canada and Syngenta to deliver Operation Pollinator in Ontario. Over 60 acres of offset land was seeded across the province. During OSCIA’s tour last week, participants visited three sites that were planted in 2018 with a mix of seeds that produce flowers loved by bees of all types.

    This is the second summer for each of the three plots, and visitors were able to see how the plots have developed and changed as they matured and grew. The first plot still had a significant variety of flowers. The owner reported that a regular passerby once commented that he was surprised that the plot was left to grow with weeds. He didn’t know what the flowers were for or the true meaning of the word “weed.”

    The second and third plots visited were mostly Phacelia in the first year, but are now dominated by clover, one red and the other yellow, which shows how dominant plants emerge over time. The second location already had some beehives nearby, which were very active; The owner reported already having to split one hive. She also reported capturing a bee swarm, which is now developing into a productive hive.

    When standing close to the stand of flowers, the sound of buzzing bees and insects can easily be heard, suggesting that having these specific areas for pollinators is a benefit to the environment. Many farms across Ontario most likely have an acre or two that easily can be turned into a site for pollinators, creating a win-win-win situation: for the pollinators, the environment and consumer relations.

    CFFO members are invited to learn more about bees and the bee farming industry in Ontario during our annual Agri-Day, Tuesday, August 27, 2019. This fun-filled tour will take place in the Niagara region, where guests will learn more about the bee-keeping industry, tour local apiaries, and visit a local winery and meadery. More information is available on the Christian Farmers Federation of Ontario website.

    Read More »
Scroll to top